One Step Too Far by Tina Seskis

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Emily Coleman woke up one day and decided to walk out of her life forever. New job, new place to live, new name, new persona…Will she survive in her new life, knowing no one, no friends or family to help her or guide her along the way? Why did Emily run away? What happened to Emily to make her leave everything behind? Was it marital strain or the pressure of being a parent? Was it her emotionally unstable twin sister? Her parents’ dysfunctional relationship? Will Emily be tempted into a life of excess and irresponsible decisions now that she’s off the radar?

This is a novel about a woman who took that urge to run away to the extreme and actually became someone else…But what is she running from and will it catch her before she runs herself into a situation from which she can’t escape? What is her secret? And do you really want to know?

If you like darker authors like Gillian Flynn (Gone Girl, Sharp Objects, Dark Places), you will want to read One Step Too Far, by Tina Seskis.

Dog Crazy, by Meg Donohue

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Meg Donohue, author of How to Eat a Cupcake and All the Summer Girls, has once again touched the hearts of readers with her new novel, Dog Crazy.

Pet Bereavement Counselor Maggie Brennan sees people daily who have experienced the terrible loss of a pet, and she helps them to process their grief and find a new normal. But Maggie has a very intense secret of her own. Maggie hasn’t left her apartment for nearly 3 months because of debilitating agoraphobia. When an intense young girl comes into her office, she finds herself pulled into her life, and pulled out of hiding.

Can Maggie learn to live out in the world, or will she continue to hide and keep her secret from the world? Can she reach out to others when she can barely take care of herself? This is a novel about reaching out, and getting over our fears and out of our comfort zone for the greater good.

If you liked the other novels by Meg Donohue, Dog Crazy will not disappoint. Add this one to your amazon wish list, it comes out in March!

All the Summer Girls by Meg Donohue

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Three  women grew up together spending summers on the Jersey Shore and went their separate ways upon adulthood. Kate moved to Philadelphia and became a very serious lawyer, Dani moved to San Francisco and is still thinking someday she will write a novel, but in the meantime she can’t seem to hold a job, and Vanessa is a very active stay-at-home mother in New York City. When they decide to come together at the beach for a stay that will bring the secrets of the past out into the open, challenging their friendships and perceptions of their own lives, and forcing them to decide whether they will move forward or hold onto the events of the past, letting it weigh them down.

All the Summer Girls, by Meg Donohue, is a good beach read and a good example of chicklit. There is some sadness and heartbreak, but the ending is satisfying. Meg Donohue also wrote How to Eat a Cupcake, which a was another great chicklit pick.

Safe Within by Jean Reynolds Page

Elaine Forsyth and her fading husband, Carson, moved into her parents’ full-sized treehouse by the lake so that he can spend his remaining days in peace. Moving back to where they grew up brings up some old, un-faced issues that Elaine finds herself confronted with at every turn. Her mother-in-law, Greta, has never approved of Elaine, and refuses to talk to her or acknowledge that her son is the father of Elaine’s son, Mick. Mick is dealing with his own skeletons, as he spends the summer with his mother, grieving the loss of his father and tracing his old steps, only to find that there is a secret involving his past girlfriend that everyone in town seems to know about, except for him.

This is a novel about tieing up the loose ends of your life and finding closure where you least expect it, and it is a novel about making your own family, regardless of history or even genetics-family and life are what you make them. Grief, loss, and letting go of the past so you can move forward, all factor into this surprisingly uplifting story by Jean Reynolds Page, which stresses that even though you can’t change the past, you can always try to do better with the present.

If you like women’s fiction you will enjoy this novel, especially if you liked A Simple Thing by Kathleen McCleary, or The Roots of the Olive Tree by Courtney Miller Santo.